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How Is A Stroke Treated?

How Is A Stroke Treated?
Transcript

There are two ways to treat a stroke and it's similar whether you have diabetes or not. The first one consists of trying to open up the blood vessel that's been blocked. You can only do that in the first two to three hours after the stroke starts. So if the stroke is already well beyond that, then it consists of blood thinners to try and prevent the clot from extending, as well as controlling blood pressure to some degree. And then also just the overall improvement in the diabetic state. Better control of blood sugar, better control of blood pressure, taking care of that you're taking your medicines, that you're touching base with your doctor. In other words, all the things that we've talked about before, control the diabetes, control the blood pressure, control the cholesterol, and then we use blood thinners, usually. Sometimes milder blood thinners like aspirin or Clopidogrel and sometimes more powerful blood thinners such as Warfarin or Rivaroxaban or Apixaban.

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Joseph Alpert, MD

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  • Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Medicine
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Doctor Profile

Joseph Alpert, MD

Cardiologist

  • Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Medicine
  • Board Certified Cardiologist
  • Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine

Doctor Profile

Joseph Alpert, MD

Cardiologist

  • Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Medicine
  • Board Certified Cardiologist
  • Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine

Doctor Profile

Joseph Alpert, MD

Cardiologist

  • Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Medicine
  • Board Certified Cardiologist
  • Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine

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